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Bolivia

Bolivia: "Friendly Settlement" in conscientious objection case

Bolivia and a Jehovah's Witness conscientious objector reached a "friendly settlement" following a petition to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights by the Bolivian ombudsman. According to Report No 97/05, "Alfredo Díaz Bustos is a Jehovah's Witness whose right to conscientious objection has been violated by the State, directly affecting his freedom of conscience and religion, and that the State has failed to fulfill its obligation to respect and ensure the rights established in the American Convention, to which Bolivia is a party.

Friendly Settlement Alfredo Díaz Bustos v Bolivia

REPORT Nº 97/05

PETITION 14/04

FRIENDLY SETTLEMENT

ALFREDO DÍAZ BUSTOS

BOLIVIA

October 27, 2005

I. SUMMARY

Bolivia

26/05/1998

1 Conscription

conscription exists

Bolivia has compulsory military service. [1] [2]

Art. 8, para. f of the constitution states: "Every person has the duty to perform civilian and military service that the nation requires for its development, defence and conservation." Art. 313 states: "Every Bolivian is obliged to perform military service in accordance with the law." [3]

The current legal basis of conscription is unknown.

Parallel to compulsory military service, a so called pre-military service exist.

Country Profiles

Brazil

Brazil is the fifth largest country in the world. Under the military government (1964-1985), Brazil also accumulated the largest foreign debt in the world—US $121 billion. A constitutional process began in 1986, culminating in a new Constitution in 1988. Fernando Collor de Mello was elected President in 1990, the first directly-elected president since 1960.

Country Profiles

Brazil

Brazil is the fifth largest country in the world. Under the military government (1964-1985), Brazil also accumulated the largest foreign debt in the world--US $121 billion. A constitutional process began in 1986, culminating in a new Constitution in 1988. Fernando Collor de Mello was elected President in 1990, the first directly-elected president since 1960.

Economy: Gross National Product per capita is $2,540 (to compare, GNP per capita in the US is $20,910). High inflation, with almost half the population living below the poverty line.

Facts at a Glance

Brazilian women won the right to vote in 1932. Today, women represent 5 percent of the House of Deputies and .24 percent of the Senate.

Some 20 percent of Brazil's 35 million families are now headed by women. Most are poor and live with inadequate sanitation: over 90 percent of children under a year old in the Northeast live in homes with inadequate sewage systems.

Women in Brazil earn, on the average, 52 percent of what men do.

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