Books

Transitions to civilian-based defence

Gene Sharp

Gene Sharp is president of the Albert Einstein Institution in Boston, Massachussetts, and is the author of numerous books on nonviolence and civilian-based defence.

What are the more likely ways by which a shift from military-based defence to a civilian-based defence system might be actually implemented? That question is the focus of this paper.

Yugoslavia: the past and the future

Marko Hren

Marko Hren was active in the Ljubljana Peace Movement Working Group throughout the '80s and has recently been involved in setting up both a Centre for the Culture of Peace and Nonviolence and a Peace Research Institute. A member of the WRI Council, he initiated the campaign for Slovenia Without an Army.

People Power: The Philippines

Maria Serena I Diokno

Maria Serena I Diokno is the executive director of the José W Diokno Foundation, a human rights organisation. As were most conference participants, she was heartened by the examples of nonviolent changes in Eastern Europe, but had a warning: the initial impulse of people's power must be organised and sustained if real change is to continue. Diokno was also sceptical about applying Western ideas about nonviolence and social defence to situations in the South.
Notes to the text:

The Intifada

Andrew Rigand Nafez Assaily

Czechoslovakia's nonviolent revolution

Jan Kavan, Ruth Sormova, and Michaela Neubauerova

Nonviolent people's struggles in India

Narayan Desai

Narayan Desai has had a long experience with nonviolence -- his father was Gandhi's personal secretary, and Narayan was raised in Gandhi's ashram. Narayan lives at his own ashram, the Institute for Total Revolution, and at the time of conference was Chair of War Resisters' International. In his opening address to the Conference, he analysed four contemporary examples of Indian nonviolence.

I will talk about four recent cases of people's power and nonviolent action. Two can be considered successful, or at least immediate successes.

Towards liberation. A draft statement for the WRI

Life can be better than this. The most fortunate of us have been crippled and scarred; we are less than we could be. All of us have lived in societies where individuals, groups, classes exert arbitrary power over others. This is the essence of oppression. Women and men who should be able to think and decide and act for themselves are forced to be the obedient instruments of the will of others.

Nor is it the conditions of the present time alone that cripple us. 'The tradition of all the dead generations weighs like a nightmare on the brain of the living' wrote Marx. The history and culture of every society shapes the consciousness of those born and brought up within it, and no culture is without repressions, taboos, and myths which limit the growth of individuals and of society as a whole. Without a profound cultural revolution there is no revolution at all.

Training in Nonviolence

This pamphlet is based on the proceedings of the War Resisters' International 1965 Study Conference on Training in Non-Violence held in Perugia, August 13th-20th, with the help of the WRI Section, Movimento Nonviolento Per La Pace, Perugia, Italy.

Training for Nonviolent Action

The following material is based on the discussion which took place at the Preston Patrick Seminar on "evaluation of methods of training for nonviolent action." We are very happy to present it to our readers as a special issue of War Resistance. .

The WRI is particularly grateful to Theodore Olson and Lynne Shivers who have prepared this document and have given us the opportunity to publish it.

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