Consequences of the "New NATO"

"New NATO" poses quite some challenges for the power balance in the world and goes beyond defending security. NATO has already moved east and therefore closer to Russia, which lost its former allies. The Cold War has got a new meaning.

The decision of the NATO in April 1999 not to restrict itself to the defence of the alliance anymore, but from now on also operate 'out of area' in principle, if vital interests of the alliance are at stake, will have negative consequences:

  1. The New NATO opens the way to more military interventions like the bombing of Yugoslavia, even without sanction of the Security Council.
  2. The New NATO, being not a purely defence-organisation anymore but a powerfull interest-organisation of the West, will indirectly undermine the international order and the position and the autority of the United Nations.
  3. The New NATO provokes other nuclear superpowers like Russia and China. (In the new Russian military doctrine since Potin became interimpresident the NATO for instance is again the enemy. Count your blessings. Except the 'out of area'-strategy of the NATO, two other reasons for this change are: a) the NATO-expansion towards the Russian boarder, and b) the Kosovo-war. If people speak of a new Cold War coming, the arrogance power of the West and especially of the US seems to be the main reason for that. The New NATO is an expression or a concequence of that power of arrogance.
  4. The New NATO is also a threat for big regional powers, who especially after the Kosovo-war of the NATO see in development of more nuclear, chemical and biological weapens as the only option. The New NATO in other words increases the arms race.
  5. The New NATO will strengthen the trend since 1990 of the return to 19th century 'Real-Politics', based on interests and power. The logic of power-politics is not idealism.
  6. The New NATO will arouse mistrust and an anti-western spirit in the East and the South. It also is a counterproductive answer to international terrorism.

Reforming the NATO from within seems not fruitfull.

Summary by Hans Feddema